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12 Dec 2016   admin

A Worldwide Scavenger Hunt For Type Nerds

Its hard to escape Futura type. Especially in Europe, its everywhere you look. In part, its popularity is due to the fact that it was the first geometric gothic typeface, as well as the first sans serif typeface to be cast and produced in all weights, grades, and fonts. This seems to have ensured its wide appeal, from corporate logos to movie posters.

We all have particular types that we love or loathe, but Futura seems to inspire particular loyalty. So much so that German graphic designers have created an online space to hype the type” – a website where people can post images of examples of Futura type that theyve found. You can check out the site below: 

Futura type website


The prevalence of Futura type inspired the name of the site:
Futura type trap. Examples have flooded in from type nerds all over the world. So far, South Africa is sadly under-represented so if you know your serif from your sans-serif, get looking and get snapping.

Futura was inspired by the rational geometric patterns of the Bauhaus movement. Originally created in 1927, it has exhibited remarkable staying power. This was also the year of the first solo transatlantic flight, the first talking movie, and when two staples of modern domesticity were invented: colour TV and the pop-up toaster.

The Futura Type Trap project aims to honour the legacy of the designer of Futura, Paul Renner, and to highlight the continued relevance and usefulness of his type in todays world.

As with many crowdsourced projects, theres a competitive element to this scavenger hunt. The websites top spots feature showcases outstanding examples of Future usage, while cities are ranked by the number of examples submitted. Unsurprisingly, Germany leads the way.

The websites approach is simple. Type nerds are encouraged to find examples of Futura, photograph them, and upload them to the site. Location data from the smartphone is used to plot the images on the type-trap map. Billed immodestly but almost certainly accurately as the biggest global hunt for the Futura typeface, this project is heaven for type nerds but quite possibly incomprehensible to anyone else.

It seems that this hobby has yet to catch on in South Africa, despite this being a design-obsessed nation where words and how they are written are of great significance in telling our stories. In fact, not one single found example of Futura typeface has been uploaded from anywhere in Africa.

Were just days away from the 90th anniversary year of Futura typeface. This is a font that deserves better. So, were calling on all type nerds to get out there, and put South Africa on the map. Futura was the future once; dont let it become the past.





12 Dec 2016   admin

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12 Dec 2016   admin

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